My 5 days OOO – breaking busy

“The price of anything is the amount of life you exchange for it.” -Henry David Thoreau

This is a real INSTA-GRAM that I took with my phone and uploaded immediately onto my IG feed. It’s been a while since I have done that. Usually images are taken with some other camera and if I can be honest, the version I posted on IG didn’t fit my feed, but I didn’t care.

I took 5 days off, the entire week off. When I say off, I still answered emails. I just didn’t sit in front of the computer like most days. I had no scheduled shoots. No products to test, review, social posts were already scheduled. I just had nothing on the calendar. Which allowed me to do what you see above, last minute, celebrate Sommer’s birthday with a spa day. Because my schedule was clear.

That’s why I want in life. Flexibility. Freedom. Busy being free, being social and being smart with my time, also with work more focused. Not busy doing stuff.

That’s why I want in life. Flexibility. Freedom. Busy being free, being social and being smart with my time, also with work more focused. Not busy doing stuff.

All week I finally edited and published two personal travel videos from Stockholm and Prague, sorted, got a new iPhone 8 Plus, sold a kidney to pay for it, organized, cleaned out drawers in every room (tip: stay in every room until it’s done before moving onto the next and empty it all out), organized closets, saw a few friends if they wanted to meet up (I had a completely clear schedule so I was open), Christmas shopped, watched movies with Benjamin, talked on the phone, wrapped presents, just hung out.

Also, winner of the last giveaway is – Melissa. But since I am feeling generous, I am awarding all who entered the giveaway some goodies too. So thanks for entering all 3 of you – haha. See you never know when I’ll do that! ;)

The other week I got this in my inbox, and I really wanted to share. It’s about busy and the BS of it. I couldn’t agree more and I wanted to encourage you.

Time is what life is made of.


BS of Busy – 12/08/17
Written by Robert Glazer
Founder & CEO, Acceleration Partners

There’s a response to a commonly asked question that’s become a conversational crutch:

“How’s it going?” “Good! Just busy.”

This exchange is ubiquitous in both our personal and professional lives. It’s as if busyness carries a certain status symbol. Yet, being” busy” doesn’t make us happier; and it doesn’t make us more productive. It just means we are filling all of our available time.

Years ago, in one of our quarterly offsite meetings, a leadership team member told our facilitator, “I just don’t have enough time!” The facilitator’s looked at her, then at all of us, and said, “As a leader, ‘not enough time’ is an excuse you all must take out of your vocabulary. If you are waiting for all this free time to come, it’s never going to happen. It’s about what you prioritize and how you use your time. Effective leaders know how to prioritize what’s most important.”

It’s about what you prioritize and how you use your time. Effective leaders know how to prioritize what’s most important.

His words have stuck with me. Even though I still find the phrasing “I’ve been busy!” on the tip of my tongue when someone asks me how I’ve been, I make a conscious effort not to say it. I try and remind my team to do the same.

Instead of hopelessly waiting to be given the gift of more free time, consider what high-achievers do to stay focused and accomplish large, long-term goals. They:

  1. Accept that time is a precious and fixed resource
  2. Know how to separate Urgent from Important
  3. Align their top priorities with their core purpose and or core values
  4. Don’t book 100% of their time; they value rest and relaxation
  5. Constantly look for things that they should stop doing
  6. Are selective about the people they give their energy to

Management guru Peter Drucker has said that effective leaders record, manage and consolidate their time. If we were more accountable and honest with ourselves about our time and how we spend it, I think we’d all be far more effective and happier. Turns out, most people aren’t very accurate in recollecting how they spent their time in a given day or week.

When an important task isn’t getting done, it’s important to acknowledge and admit that you have chosen to spend your time on less important tasks (i.e. posting on Facebook and Instagram). Instead of saying “I didn’t have enough time,” try saying “I chose to do X today instead of Y” or “I’m getting distracted” or “I’m focusing on the wrong things.”

Diana Elizabeth is an author, photographer, and obsessive antique shopper. You can typically find her in her garden wrist deep in dirt, at a local estate sale or planning her next epic party.

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