Fresh garden eats

phoenix-backyard-urban-garden-farming-carrots-purple-2

Oh boy it’s starting to warm up.  Easter Sunday I decided to poke around the garden.  This means, going out with a natural spray (or this) to get rid of pests eating my garden, rip off dead artichoke leaves (they are massive and sticky), and check on things that are growing.  Tip:  Sit still long enough to watch your garden and you my catch brown caterpillars on the move!  Always take time to sit and observe.

I also decide if I want them to flower – which for some, means they will die, or if I should clip them, or harvest anything that is ready.

phoenix-backyard-urban-garden-farming-carrots-purple-lettuce

In this area I have purple carrot I started from seeds.  The little cute leaves you see budding are the malabar spinach that needs a trellis.  Apparently the berries fell, and they will just keep on coming!  I’m so excited to have things that do that so I don’t have to buy new ones.  It dies every winter because of the frost, but in spring they come back up and it thrives during the summer.  You can cook it or throw it in salad.  it’s a bit thicker than most spinach.

phoenix-backyard-urban-garden-farming-carrots-purple

I also decided to dig up a few carrots.  This year I sowed the seeds in taller raised beds since last season I put them in shallow boxes which resulted in very scary, short, chubby looking carrots that the Mr. wouldn’t touch.  They went to the bunnies.  This year, look at them!  The carrots are from seed tape, because I’m very lazy to sow seeds sometimes.

phoenix-backyard-urban-garden-farming-carrots-purple-3

Because I was gone for a few days in Dallas for TGIFridays last week, I missed the right time to harvest my artichokes.  This is one thing I’ve learned, my first harvest season typically is semi-successful because I wait too long, unsure when it’s the right time to harvest them. Last season I waited for the peppers to get larger (I’m from Northern California so I assume produce is large and hefty), but later learned from local gardening classes that in the dessert, we are unable to get things that large.

I love how large my artichokes get!  Did you know they are perennials and can live up to 5 years?  I would love to landscape with them.  I’ve decided to let a few flower as we still have more artichokes on their way.

phoenix-backyard-urban-garden-farming-artichoke-2 phoenix-backyard-urban-garden-farming-artichoke phoenix-backyard-urban-garden-farming-artichokes

Benjamin is so sad about it.  But I reminded him at Sprouts artichoke heads are only .99.

My Queen Elizabeth rose is doing well.  She was battling a fungus over the winter which is never fun.  After lots of oil spray, I think she’ll be fine.  I brought one in to sit by my kitchen sink.

phoenix-backyard-urban-garden-farming-rose

And since I have finally successfully grown lettuce because I understand they are a cool vegetable, it’s time to start eating them.  I do get terrified of eating my own grown things because of bugs.  I told Mr. Wonderful not to stare too closely into the salad just in case I missed washing a few bugs off.   I have terrible bugs in salad stories at restaurants that for a good few years, I stopped eating vegetables all together.  I’ll spare you the stories, but once, I found a sharp screw in my salad at a restaurant which was clearly not from the garden.

phoenix-backyard-urban-garden-farming-strawberries

Oh, and the few survivors that didn’t get attacked by birds.  I threw those into our Easter salad.

I should have a pig so I could have had him for Easter dinner.  Just kidding.  I did say that I should have bought a little honey baked ham but I was terribly bad at planning much since I was out of town.  Thankfully I can wing anything and Mr. Wonderful is thrilled.

A few things I have my eyes on to help with this summer’s harvest, and a few things I already have that might help your garden:

summer-garden-ready-spring-blogger-phoenix-urban-farming-garden
Row 1:  Tubular Metal Half Garden Arbor / Bendable Steel Garden Edging / Solid Wood Garden Storage Cubby
Row 2: Cucumber Trellis / Raised bed corners / Tomato Ladders, set of 3
Row 3: Willow Plant Support, set of 2 / Seed Tape / Adjustable stem supports, set of 3
Row 4:  Floral Cotton Bandana / Leather and Linen Garden Gloves / Strawberry supports, set of 6

I crazy love that bandana.  I think I’ll sew one of my own this week with Liberty London fabric.

Diana Elizabeth is now reminded her time outdoors may have be earlier.  So this might also mean she needs to wake up earlier.  The bunnies are enjoying outdoors but prefer sitting on the dirt to stay cool.

Diana Elizabeth is an author, photographer, and obsessive antique shopper. You can typically find her in her garden wrist deep in dirt, at a local estate sale or planning her next epic party.

4 Comments

POST COMMENT

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *