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Almost two years ago, I was thisclose to quitting my photography career.  This would have been insane, I was doing pretty well, but I was overwhelmed.

I was losing my passion for photography and I thought, oh great, now what will I do if this is all over?

I realized the problem was – I was doing too much, and too much of the same stuff. I had done so much during my first year out of the entrepreneur gates – I was constantly booking, marketing, posting, and blogging. I rarely had a day where I wasn’t meeting a connection, shooting, or editing. I was religiously reading photography blogs, attending workshops every few months, growing, learning – as every serious photographer who wants to build a serious career out of photography does.

I worked weekends, worked late into the nights because I loved it, and then, and finally, it all caught up to me. I was drained – emotionally and creatively. I would almost cry when a shoot was approaching, and then I realized I was busy, but busy doing things that I was no longer passionate about, which in turn, made me feel like I was a hamster on a wheel going nowhere, and what I really wanted to be was a wild stallion able to run free and change direction just like the wind.

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This is what I had to do to save my sanity, mind, and photography career:

  • I stop shooting everyone who had a business for free.  Even though I wanted to help, and some were good causes, I had no time left to rest.
  • I stopped shooting in exchange for credit lines.  They don’t pay the bills, and I realized I didn’t need to expand my portfolio or make connections – connections come with publications who respect the time and talents of a professional.
  • I stopped reading photography magazines.  I threw them straight in the trash or gave them to budding photographer friends.  Reading them only made me feel like I was constantly behind.
  • I stopped (temporarily) following wedding blogs or other photographers just because I needed a breather to create on my own and not feel inadequate. (Read this essay for more: “Why I hate Wedding Photography”)
  • I also stopped reading business magazines, anything that made me feel like I was constantly running a race.  My mind wanted to explode.
  • I had to remind myself to stop comparing myself to others.
  • I redecorated my office.  I took down a lot of my work so I could lessen the pressure  I had on myself to constantly be doing photography. I wanted to enjoy it again without feeling the pressure that if I wasn’t doing it, I had to be thinking about it.
  • I started to make a list of what subjects I enjoyed photographing, and what I didn’t.  That included photographing babies, that went on the no list and I made a friend who does it well and I refer to her.
  • I taught up and coming photographers because seeing their excitement reminded myself why I fell in love with photography – it helped tremendously.
  • I stopped booking weddings.  I turned down a ton of inquiries, even those who had the sweetest emails. I passed along the referrals.  I still do weddings, but for six months, I said no.  I needed the break.
  • I now have many requirements before I agree to work a wedding.  This includes a first look and a wedding planner.  If I’m going to do a job, I want to make sure I enjoy it , it is structured, I am able to perform my best during that time, and the couple is a perfect fit.
  • I stopped writing for online photography sites.  I was overwhelmed with the weekly articles.  I stepped away and took a break.  Months later, I was approached by another site and I had enough rest to return to instructing.
  • I decided to stop shooting a specific subject and consider other areas – corporate, editorial, and so on.
  • I increased my pricing so I could shoot less frequently but still make the same amount.
  • I learned how to say no.
  • I learned that it’s OK to not have the same success as every one else.

I think it can be so easy to fall in love with something, want to do it for a career because of that saying that puts the pressure on the entrepreneur spirit – Do what you love.  Because, if you aren’t, that must mean you’re just plain miserable every day.

But if we’re not careful, taking on too much to do what we love can make us miserable.

By setting boundaries, limiting my bookings, and knowing that I didn’t need the so called opportunity for a credit line, I was able to free up time.  Time to rest, time to enjoy life, and the time I always wanted to have which is why I became a photographer in the first place.

That time has been long in the past, but it was a tough experience to over come, a sheer feeling of panic that if I wouldn’t be able to over come the feeling, my career was over.  Now crazy back in love with photography, you’ll only see me doing what really moves me.

Have you ever been overwhelmed by what you do, photography or not?  Did you ever get over it or did you quit?

Diana Elizabeth says it’s OK to change direction because life is always about discovering what the next thing that will challenge you.  Being burnt out is normal, it’s not failure and walking away from something that isn’t a fit any longer is better than staying and being miserable.